​​ GERMAN SHEPHERD CANINE

It does not matter how prepared you think you are or how many pets you have said good bye to in the past.

There is no way to remove the pain and sorrow that follows.

This is a testament to the pet that has shared his or her life with us and given us companionship, love, loyalty, laughter, devotion and was a valued family member who will be greatly missed and never forgotten.

 If you are unsure about making the decision to let your friend go peacefully speak with your Vet since there are so many variables and all circumstances are different, speak with a trusted friend or family member who may have gone through this experience and therefore will be much more understanding at this time in your life, seek out resource material to read in order to determine what is best and at the same time trying to keep your dog’s quality of life as a determining factor in making your decision.

It is always a difficult decision but “rest assured that once you have weighed all of the factors,  it will be the right time and the kindest thing you can do for such a good friend.” When you know in your mind and heart that this is the time, please remember;

“Death leaves a heartache no one can heal.” 
  “Love leaves a memory no one can steal.”

Below I have named all of the pets that have been a part of my family and my life. Some have passed many years ago to Rainbow Bridge, they all have a special place in my heart and I still enjoy the many fond memories that they have all given to me and  my loved ones.   

Rex 
German Shepherd
10   years
Mickey
Cat
5    years
Lex 
German Shepherd
11  years
Brandy 
Cat
8    years
Estee
Cat
8    years
Crystal
Cat
15   years
Camille
Cat
12  years
Boo Boo
Cat
10   years
Lexx II
German Shepherd
7    years
Trout  /Fa
Mixed Dalmation /


Terrier & Border Collie
8    years
Brandy 
German Shepherd
15   years
Betty Loo
Labrador
13   years
Ebony
Cat
18   years
Tiger
Cat
20   years
Dahlia
Cat
18   years
Jacky
Jack Russel Terrier
10   years
Ratty
Ferret
8   years
Puss Catt
Cat
21   years
Charlie (aka) Scooter
Shizu mix
20  years
Billy
Jack Russell Terrier
13   years
Ringo
Jack Russell Terrier
14   years
Oprah
Labrador / Rottweiler
14   years
Boris
Cat
5   years
Natasha
Cat
16   years
Gussy
Cat
7   years
Peanut
Cat
5  years
Max
German Shepherd
13  years
Blossom
Cat
6  years
Jetta aka Turdy
Horse
7   years
Phil
Horse
28   years
Margaret
Horse
26   years
Pistol
Horse
22   years

​Babe  aka Mr. Witch               Horse                                   24   years


LETTING GO / THE LAST GIFT

I would rather feel this pain then not to experience the joy of living with a German Shepherd, or any other pet for that matter.  

Personally, we have chosen cremation for our departed dogs and cats remains. Everyone has their own special way of looking after this. I have a little memorial for Max where his ashes are now in a special box that I bought for him with his name engraved on the surface. I have placed photos of him and one of his balls along with several other items around this box that contains his remains.

There are many ways you can design a memorial for your pet that is just as individual and unique as he or she was.

I made that telephone call that I so desperately wanted to avoid, to Dr. Doug in order that I could give Max that last gift being a smooth passage and a peaceful death.

Since I wanted Max to be put to sleep (euthanized) at home with his family and in his familiar surroundings, Dr. Doug agreed to make this house call. At my request I received a drug for Max to relax him prior to the Vet’s visit. The morning that Dr. Doug was coming over I gave Max the drug by injecting it into one of his rear muscles and within minutes Max was sleeping very soundly.

My Vet came over and administered the anesthesia drug to stop Max’s heart while I lay beside Max on his bed petting him, telling him there would be no more pain and expressing my deepest love for my beautiful boy, Max.

"“How lucky you and I have been to have someone”
“That made saying goodbye so hard”."


 The tears will dry and you will remember all of those many wonderful times and memories that you have shared with your departed German Shepherd or other pets that were once a part of your family and always will be for that matter.  

One of the most difficult decisions we must make for our dogs and all pets is the decision to have them euthanized or as I commonly describe this procedure as putting to sleep. Some times our dog’s lives are ended when nature makes the decision.

THE WAY is from Sue Long's Paw Prints Collection ( from the Fundy) which she uses to aid funds for many Animal Rescues in order to support those that have no voice. Sue will do personal prints for you as well. You may view more of Sue Long's Paw Print Collection which is heartfelt and simply beautiful work.

Pet Loss,  EMOTIONAL DECISIONS WE MAY HAVE TO MAKE FOR OUR DOGS.

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Dr Doug advised to increase all of his medication, specifically the Metacam and Cartrofin. The medication was not helping my dear boy any more and my heart was just wrenched, as the tears are in my eyes while I write this here today, almost 2 years after Max’s passing.

 However, this is usually not the case and since we are in control of their well being, this decision is left to us to decide when life has become too much of a task for our dogs or any of our much loved pets and I really struggled with making this decision for Max.

Since we were on such a roller coaster, I suppose I was waiting for that miracle drug that Dr. Doug informed me was yet to be discovered.  

This decision is our responsibility and we made this commitment when we brought our German Shepherd home as a puppy or adult dog.

To make this decision is not easy and even if the decision to euthanize is clear cut, it is still an extremely difficult one to make. 

I had to start questioning myself. Was I keeping him going for me or for him?

Max’s life now was painful for him and he could hardly walk. He no longer could go in his truck for rides as he used to love and we felt sad to have to leave him at home when we did go out. He could no longer play ball or enjoy the long walks that he used to get so excited to go on.

The arthritis took his freedom and fun away from him. He was unable to get up or down the stairs; he could no longer manage the one small step at the front entrance. 

The saddest truth was the fact and reality that Max was not going to get better and I felt really helpless. His bad days now surpassed any good day by a long shot. 

Life had become a real challenge for Max and this tore my heart out, it was my responsibility to let go for Max’s sake, Max's dignity, Max's pride and Max's well being.

I knew in my heart that the decision to let Max go was approaching real quick. He was still so bright, so alert and his appetite was excellent.  Since I was the caregiver I took the position that the decision to let Max go would be mine. Dr. Doug expressed the fact that he could not make this decision, but at the same time he also expressed to me that,

“This is the last gift that you"
"can give him”.

  • One Sweet Day (feat. Boyz II Men)4:41

​​​​​To anyone out there that is going through the loss of a dear pet,

I am so sorry that you have to go through this.

Another Angel has gone home.

Some special links below to help and assist you at this very emotional time.

​​SHOPPING

Every day that Max had a good day, I would pray for a good week. During the last 6 months of Max’s life the arthritis progressed rapidly until Max was almost immobile.

During  the last 2 weeks of Max’s life he could no longer get up very often on his own although we took him outside every day after his first meal of the day. My husband would have to pull him a little by his collar and I would lift him from behind to support his hips and legs. Once Max was up he could slowly walk from the house to outside where he would walk around the yard, relieve himself and sniff.  Once he lay down outside, he was usually unable to get up without assistance from us.  He also fell a lot more and it was to dangerous to take him out of his yard for a walk. 


Many folks  swear never to have another dog. 

I believe this is part of the grieving process as well. I always encourage someone who feels this way to get another.

He or she will never replace your pet or pets who are now gone.

He or she will have his or her own identity, individualism and personality. Those little puppy bundles are pretty hard to resist, new life and new adventures.

The adult or rescue dogs who really need a chance at another home, where they will be valued as part of a loving family in their forever home that they so deserve.  He or she will repay you with all the love in the world and give you many more wonderful memories.